Review ~ The Wizard Killer: Season 1

The Wizard Killer ~ Season 1
Author: Adam Dreece

Prepare yourself for an adventure in this post-apocalyptic futuristic fantasy story penned by indie author Adam Dreece. The Wizard Killer ~ Season 1 is written in an episodic, serialized style that makes this a quick and engaging read.  Each chapter is a little adventure in of itself, will all the chapters making up the overall story arc.  From the opening sentence when the protagonist wakes up in the forest, discovering that he has been impaled with a sword to the final passage where...well I won’t tell you since that would be a spoiler, needless to say I was thoroughly engaged.   

The protagonist, whose name you never do find out in Season 1, wakes up with a cloudy memory of who he is and what has happened to him.  As he sets out to find some semblance of civilization among all the desolation of this world, memories start to come back to him.  When he encounters a commune of people that have a hidden agenda the action really starts to take off.

My only real complaint with The Wizard Killer ~ Season 1 is that I can’t help but be disappointed that this story is written in an episodic serialized style.  This world that Decree has created is so fascinating.  I was so intrigued that I really wanted a longer story with more character and world development, and where I wasn’t left with quite so many questions.  What happened to this world?  Who is this protagonist?  What kind of powers does he have?  Where is everyone? Magic guns powered by mana?  Levitating Cars that no longer run?  So many questions and definitely not enough answers.  Even with my complaint of The Wizard Killer ~ Season 1 not being long enough I can’t wait to read Season 2.  Hopefully my questions will be answered, while also providing new questions to ask.  Think of The Wizard Killer ~ Season 1 as a graphic novel without the pictures and you will thoroughly enjoy it too.

4 Penguins

 

Review ~ The Frozen Sky

The Frozen Sky (Frozen Sky #1)
Author: Jeff Carlson

A far off place, two hundred years in the future, humans will venture out into space and harvest ice from the Jupiter's sixth moon, Europa.  From the Author that brought you Plague Year, Jeff Carlson’s First Contact space adventure thriller, The Frozen Sky,  will take you on a roller-coaster ride of emotions.  From the opening chase scene where your heart is beating to the political structure of Earth and the moral questions regarding first contact, The Frozen Sky will keep you guessing what’s going to happen, throughout the entire book.  

Robotic probes have discovered ancient carvings in a deep cave system on Europa.  Investigating first hand, Alexis Vonderach, aka Von, and her teammates have discovered an ancient buried civilization on Europa. After an accident causes a cave-in, which kills Von’s teammates, Von ends up on the front door-steps of the native population.  As First Contact with the "sunfish" goes horribly wrong, Von is chased through the caverns of Europa by the sunfish as she tries to survive.

I wanted to like this book more than I did.  The story itself is actually very intriguing and it made me think about how awful humans can be.  What rights do we humans have to the resources on another planet?  Profit is what drives Earth politics in this story (and in real life), it may be profitable to destroy another sentient life forms home, but is it moral?  

There were a lot of really interesting concepts in this novel, how space travel will work, futuristic medicine with cloned materials, communicating with an alien species, artificial intelligence.  You can tell that Carlson must have put in a ton of hours researching these concepts.  Overall the story was well done, but it took me quite some time to get into it.  I read on a Kindle, so I can’t tell you the page number, but the first 20% of the book was the initial chase scene with Von and the sunfish.  I struggled to read this part of the book, it was just too long and I was bored.  The beginning was great, you were wondering what was going on, was Von going to survive this chase, who were these creatures chasing her on this desolate and supposedly uninhabited moon? Then the chase scene kept going on and on and on, like the energizer bunny.  Eventually the story progresses from a one woman survival situation to include more characters.  Once there was interaction between other characters I was a lot more entertained and found the book easier to read.

At this time I have no plans on reading the rest of this trilogy.  

3 Penguins